Articles Posted in Arrests

The District of Columbia has notoriously strict gun laws. However, a series of court cases in the Supreme Court and lower federal courts have, to some extent, made obtaining a concealed carry permit feasible. As discussed in previous posts, several important cases have chipped away at the District’s prohibition of the possession of, registration, and carrying of firearms in the city.

The purpose of this post is not to be a treatise on these cases but its important to note the general holdings in these cases. In 2008, the Supreme Court, in Heller, held that the Second Amendment of the United States Constitution applied to the District of Columbia and stated possessing a firearm at home for self-defense was a constitutional right. In reaction to that decision, the City Council passed cumbersome regulatory laws that permitted individuals to register a firearm to possess at home for the purpose of self-defense. Simultaneously, the City Council barred anyone from carrying a pistol outside their home or place of business.

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For family members and loved ones of those arrested can experience intense anxiety, fear, and stress.  First and foremost, when someone in DC gets arrested, the police will not likely give accurate information as to where they will take the person.  If the police have told you that the person will be taken to Central Cellblock, you can call and find out if that is correct.

Central Cellblock is located next to DC Superior Court at the Metropolitan Police Headquarters.

The contact information for Central Cell Block is:

300 Indiana Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20001

Phone: (202) 727-4222
Fax: (202) 727-2230

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Owner and Founding Attorney Joseph Scrofano discusses the importance of exercising your right to remain silence. It is one of our most cherished and fundamental rights. The police, court, and government cannot lawfully hold it against you. We hear it in the movies and see it on television. It is one of our fundamental rights under the constitution. The two most important things you can do in any police interaction are: (1) show respect and cooperate with the officer; and (2) assertively yet respectfully assert your rights. It may sound contradictory but you should even say the words: I am asserting my right to silence. People often ask whether they should answer questions that police officers ask. And a common misconception out there is that your case will get dismissed if the officer fails to read your Miranda rights.

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There are a lot of important qualities to look for when hiring a criminal defense lawyer.  You want an attorney who truly cares about their clients.  Its important for a criminal defense lawyer to have a strong and aggressive personality.  Trust me, the government will literally run you over in a criminal case and not think twice about it if you let it.  You absolutely want someone who is strong and willing to fight.

However, in my opinion, the most important thing to look for is an attorney who will be completely honest with his clients.  For example, in the District of Columbia Superior Court almost all first offenders can get probation in DUI cases so long as nothing in the arrest triggers mandatory minimum jail time (for example, a breath score above .20 triggers mandatory minimum jail).  If you walk into a DC DUI lawyer’s office having blown a .14 as a first offender with no other criminal history, no car accident, or other aggravating circumstances and he or she tells you that you could be facing serious jail time, walk out.

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private-sign-1382045-mIf you are arrested in the District of Columbia, the police will confiscate your property.  The police will take your property and in most cases they make it very difficult (if not impossible) for you to get your property back.  When they take your property, there are three primary manners in which they categorize the property, which determine the process you must use to get it back.

First, personal property, which may include keys, wallet, and other personal items.  That type of property is the easiest to get back.  The police should give you a property receipt, which you can take back to the police station to get your items returned.  However, the police will not release personal effects to a third-party.  That means if you are locked up after your arrest, you cannot send a friend or family member to pick up the property.

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