Articles Tagged with arrests

DC DUI

DC DUI

In short, the answer is maybe. The District of Columbia record sealing statute makes Driving under the Influence and Driving while Intoxicated “ineligible misdemeanors.” Accordingly, on its face, the law prohibits sealing of a conviction for driving under the influence. However, a few months ago, I won an appeal that may have opened the door for getting at least some DUI convictions removed from a person’s record.

I will discuss this topic in a two part series. The first part will provide the backdrop of the District of Columbia Record Sealing Act and the problems the District of Columbia had with its Breathalyzer program for about ten years. Part Two will discuss how, because of the Breathalyzer issues and an appeal I won in May of this year, it may in fact be possible to get a DUI conviction taken off someone’s record in limited circumstances.

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dutch-weed-2-jpg-1206038-mMarijuana decriminalization took effect a few weeks ago and its important to know the facts before you spark up. First and foremost, marijuana remains illegal under federal law. There is a good chance that at least the United States Park Police and the Capitol Police—both of which have jurisdiction to make arrests in DC—will continue to make arrests for marijuana possession. Whether the United States Attorney’s Office will then prosecute those arrests in federal district court remains to be seen.

Under District of Columbia law, possession of an ounce or less of marijuana is now punishable by a $25.00 citation. The citation is akin to a speeding ticket. It does not carry possible jail time. That means if the Metropolitan Police Department (or “MPD”)—the District’s local police force—stops you and finds less than one ounce of weed, the officer should only give you a citation and let you on your way. However, smoking marijuana in public remains illegal under both federal and local law. That means if you get caught by any police agency smoking weed in public, you will likely get arrested. The penalty for smoking weed in public is akin to getting arrested for possessing an open container of alcohol.

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DC DMV Hearing

DC DMV Hearing

As previously blogged about, one of the collateral consequences of an arrest and/or conviction for a DC DUI can be the revocation or suspension of your DC driver’s license. Police officers who make an arrest for DUI or DWI are supposed to provide the arrestee with a Notice of Proposed Revocation. The Notice instructs the arrestee to request a hearing with the DC DMV. For out of state license holders, you have 15 days to request a hearing. For DC license holders, you only have 10 days to request a hearing. If you do not request a hearing, DMV will revoke your driver’s license (for a DC license holder) or driving privileges in DC (for an out of state license holder) automatically. Accordingly, its extremely important that you request a hearing after being arrested for DUI.

The hearing will be conducted by a DMV Hearing Examiner who in some ways is similar to a judge. There are three possible outcomes of a DMV Hearing. First, the Hearing Examiner may revoke your license for a period of six months or one year. Second, the Hearing Examiner may dismiss the hearing. In that case, your license remains valid and driving privileges remain intact. However, if you are ultimately convicted in the criminal case, then your license would eventually be suspended. Finally, the Hearing Examiner could “take no action,” which means license and driving privileges remain intact until the criminal case is resolved one way or the other.

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DC Gun Lawyer

A common, unfortunate scenario that often occurs in the District of Columbia because of its strict gun laws, goes something like this:

Average out-of-state, law abiding citizen with no prior criminal record travels through or to the nation’s capital. We will call him John.  John commits one of the hundreds of possible District of Columbia traffic infractions while driving.  And this traffic infraction could involve something as innocuous as hanging something from the rear view mirror or having window tint that is too dark.  One of the dozens of law enforcement agencies that has jurisdiction in the District pulls the person over.  We will call him Officer Friendly.  Officer Friendly either asks Johns: “Do you have any weapons in the vehicle” or John, accustomed to the laws of his home state, voluntarily announces to Officer Friendly that he has a firearm in the vehicle.  John then tries to show Officer Friendly his home state concealed carry permit for his lawfully registered firearm.  In John’s mind, all of this is no big deal.

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This post is the second part in the two part series discussing consequences of a DC DUI conviction.  The first part discussed direct consequences, which involved things like probation and jail time.  This discussion is not meant to be a complete list of all collateral beer-vector-1438087-mconsequences for a DC DUI or DWI conviction–just some of the most common.

The first major collateral consequence is the loss of one’s driver’s license or driving privilege.  In the District of Columbia, just an arrest for a DUI can trigger a license suspension or the suspension of one’s driving privileges in the city.  When DC police arrest someone for DUI, they are supposed to issue what’s called a Notice of Proposed Suspension.  The form should be read carefully because it provides instructions on how to prevent an immediate license suspension for the arrest.  The notice instructs the arrestee to apply for a hearing in person at the DC Department of Motor Vehicles within ten days of arrest (or fifteen days for an out of state resident).  If the arrestee does not apply for this hearing, the license or driving privileges (for an out of state resident) will be suspended or revoked.  I recommend immediately contacting an experienced DC DUI lawyer if arrested for DUI.  Many people do not read the notices or are not sure what they are supposed to do to prevent license suspension.  Applying for the hearing will basically freeze the suspension from taking effect.  It will then be up to a hearing examiner at the DMV at some future hearing date to decide whether the suspend the license or driving privileges.

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In DC criminal law, people often ask what diversion is.  This post is the first part in a three part series that answers that question.  Diversion is a program offered by the prosecution where when an individual meets certain conditions, the government will dismiss the charges against that person.  Several types of diversion programs exist in DC.  Having a criminal defense lawyer who can explain the diversion options is important when you are charged with a crime in DC.  Before understanding what type of diversion options exist, its important to know the difference between the two government agencies in DC that prosecute crimes.

As previously mentioned, the DC Office of the Attorney General (OAG) prosecutes only traffic misdemeanors.  The United States Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia (USAO) prosecutes all other misdemeanors and felony crimes.  Felonies are crimes that carry a maximum penalty of more than one year in jail.  That difference is important in and deserves further discussion in a future post.  The United States Attorney’s Office has more flexibility in diversion programs and also has more options with more reasonable requirements.  So, the first couple of posts on this topic will discuss diversion options the USAO offers.  I will discuss the OAG’s diversion police in a later post for those primarily concerned with options when they get a DC DUI.

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In the Washington, DC criminal defense world, a common scenario occurs where an individual gets pulled over by the police, arrested for DUI, and charged with two cases.  This scenario occurs when someone gets pulled over, the officer arrests the person for DUI, and later finds drugs in the vehicle—regardless of whether the drugs actually belong to the person arrested.

In most jurisdictions, that person would get charged for two crimes: drug possession and DUI.  In DC, however, the person will not only get two charges but have two criminal cases against them.  Two separate law enforcement agencies will prosecute each case.  The DC Office of the Attorney General will prosecute the DUI, and the United States Attorneys’ Office for the District of Columbia will prosecute the drug possession charge.  It is common for one set of facts to lead to a prosecution for two separate charges.  But DC criminal law is unique that the same set of facts can lead to prosecution for two separate cases.

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