Articles Tagged with guilty till proven innocent

nigth-at-hyper-1455387On January 25, 2016, Trump signed two draconian executive orders targeting documented and undocumented immigrants in the United States. There has been much attention regarding the executive orders barring refugees and any citizens’ entry of seven predominately Muslim countries. However, the impact on the criminal justice system regarding immigrants currently in the United States has received far less attention.

The Supreme Court case Padilla v. Kentucky placed an affirmative obligation on criminal defense attorneys to advise immigrant clients about potential immigration consequences for entering into guilty pleas. That seminal case created significant overlap between criminal defense and immigration law. Trump’s recent Executive Orders and their likely impact on the criminal justice system further blur the line between criminal defense and immigration law.

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For family members and loved ones of those arrested can experience intense anxiety, fear, and stress.  First and foremost, when someone in DC gets arrested, the police will not likely give accurate information as to where they will take the person.  If the police have told you that the person will be taken to Central Cellblock, you can call and find out if that is correct.

Central Cellblock is located next to DC Superior Court at the Metropolitan Police Headquarters.

The contact information for Central Cell Block is:

300 Indiana Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20001

Phone: (202) 727-4222
Fax: (202) 727-2230

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Owner and Founding Attorney Joseph Scrofano discusses the importance of exercising your right to remain silence. It is one of our most cherished and fundamental rights. The police, court, and government cannot lawfully hold it against you. We hear it in the movies and see it on television. It is one of our fundamental rights under the constitution. The two most important things you can do in any police interaction are: (1) show respect and cooperate with the officer; and (2) assertively yet respectfully assert your rights. It may sound contradictory but you should even say the words: I am asserting my right to silence. People often ask whether they should answer questions that police officers ask. And a common misconception out there is that your case will get dismissed if the officer fails to read your Miranda rights.

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A Wisconsin man is currently facing up to 30 years in prison after being convicted of his eighth DUI. In the state of Wisconsin, while a single DUI conviction is usually charged as a misdemeanor, multiple DUIs are charged as felonies which carry significantly higher penalties. Unlike in Wisconsin, however, DUIs within the District of Columbia are never charged as felonies.

As previously discussed, in the District, the Office of the Attorney General (OAG) has jurisdiction over the prosecution of DUIs. The OAG can only prosecute traffic misdemeanors like DUIs, reckless driving, and hit and runs. Conversely, if a person within DC is charged with a felony, the United States Attorney’s Office (USAO) has jurisdiction to prosecute the case. Consequently, the OAG will rarely ever charge a DUI as a felony because it does not want to lose jurisdiction over the case. What this means is that no matter how many DUIs you get within DC, you will only ever be charged with a misdemeanor. So while the Wisconsin man mentioned earlier faces up to 30 years in prison for eight DUI convictions, the most time a person will spend in jail for any DC DUI or DWI is up to 1 year.

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car-1232347As previously discussed, if you are arrested in the District of Columbia for a DUI, the DMV will most likely suspend or revoke your license for a period of 6 months to 2 years depending on various factors. However, the DC DMV offers an Ignition Interlock Device Program (IIDP) allows DUI and DWI offenders to get their driving privileges back faster.  An ignition interlock device is a breathalyzer connected to a car’s ignition system. To start the car, the driver must first blow into the device to check the alcohol level on his or her breath. The car will only start if the driver’s breath alcohol level is below an accepted amount on the device.

While the device itself may be a bit burdensome on a driver or a somewhat unsightly in your vehicle, DC’s IIDP gives DUI offenders a chance to reduce the suspension or revocation period on their license. What this means is that if your license is suspended because of a DC DUI and you participate in the program, you get a restricted driver’s license which allows you to drive as you once did, so long as your vehicle contains the breathalyzer. Although the program is optional at the moment, it may become mandatory for some DUI offenders.

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